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WINTER WEATHER ALERT. Residential solid waste collected Monday; commercial solid waste collected Saturday. Recycling collected Friday and Saturday by Orange County Solid Waste.  More at townofchapelhill.org/news

SNOWPLOWWinter Storm Inga Update

Chapel Hill is cleaning up after Winter Storm Inga dumped nearly a foot of snow on the town. High-traffic roads have been cleared, but icy spots remain.

Town facilities are open Friday. Chapel Hill Transit service is operating on a modified schedule. 

Residential solid waste collection will resume normal schedules next week. Commercial solid waste collection will be made up Saturday. Yard waste collection, including leaf collection, is canceled this week. Wednesday, Thursday and Friday curbside recycling routes—collected by Orange County Solid Waste—will be collected Friday and Saturday.

Read more.

Chapel Hill eNews

Post Date:01/11/2018 1:43 PM

Chapel Hill eNews

The e-newsletter of the Town of Chapel Hill offers a fresh update each week! Signing up -- or, changing your subscription preferences - is easy at www.townofchapelhill.org/signup.

Stay connected with us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube - and via our weekly newspaper ads in the Chapel Hill News.

For more information, including media inquiries and requests for hi-res photos, please contact us at info@townofchapelhill.org.

Having trouble viewing this email? Open in your web browser.

 

 

Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday

Dr. King 

Most municipal offices will be closed Monday, Jan. 15, in observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Chapel Hill Transit will operate on a Saturday Schedule. Chapel Hill Public Library will be open 1-5 p.m. Residential trash will not be collected (make-up day Wednesday, Jan. 17). Read more.

Up Front

From Town Hall

Town-Sponsored Events

Town Services

Transportation

Public Safety News

 

 

 

Up Front

 

 

TOWNweek has been posted!

www.townofchapelhill.org/townweek

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PHOTO Martin Luther King Jr. 

Things to do in Chapel Hill

University/Community Annual MLK Banquet 

5 p.m. Sunday Jan. 14

UNC Friday Conference Center, 100 Friday Center Drive Chapel Hill

UNC-Chapel Hill’s 2018 Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Week, which honors the bridge-building legacy of Dr. King, kicks off Jan. 14 and includes events that highlight the intersectionality of diversity, inclusion, and social justice. Events will celebrate and educate the UNC-Chapel Hill community about the legacy of Dr. King, using the theme, “Voices. Power. Movement.” MLK Community/University Banquet – Sunday, Jan. 14, at 6 p.m., with a reception at 5 p.m., at the William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education. Chancellor Carol L. Folt will deliver the keynote. Tickets are $30. To purchase tickets or for additional information, please contact MLK celebrations co-coordinator Ariana Wiggins at arariana@live.unc.edu.

More Information: diversity.unc.edu

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Town In News

Town in News – TIN Report – is a sampling of news media coverage about the Town of Chapel Hill compiled by the Communications and Public Affairs Department. This listing includes articles and columns that are available on the web, and may not necessarily contain all stories in the print edition of the papers or on televised broadcasts.

Links access online stories that are posted for a limited time. Some media organizations require registration or a subscription.

For information, contact us at info@townofchapelhill.org

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Town of Chapel Hill Investing in Energy Efficiency (WCHL)

The Town of Chapel Hill has recently completed a project to install a new HVAC system in Town Hall, effectively bringing down average daily energy consumption 39 percent in the building. Read more: http://chapelboro.com/news/local-government/town-chapel-hill-investing-energy-efficiency

UNC-Chapel Hill and the Town of Chapel Hill Launch Party Registration Program (UNC News)

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Town of Chapel Hill today announced a new joint initiative, “Party, Police Free.” Read more: http://uncnews.unc.edu/2018/01/10/unc-chapel-hill-town-chapel-hill-launch-party-registration-program/

Davie Poplar Fire Suspect Indicted (WCHL)

A former UNC student has officially been indicted on felony charges in connection with a fire and small explosion on the UNC campus late last year. Read more: http://chapelboro.com/news/crime/davie-poplar-fire-suspect-indicted

Chapel Hill Starting Process of Selecting New Town Manager (WCHL)

Chapel Hill’s Town Council is preparing to start identifying a process to find a new town manager. Read more: http://chapelboro.com/news/local-government/chapel-hill-starting-process-of-selecting-new-town-manager

Red Cross, firefighters helping residents displaced by Carrboro apartment fire (The Herald Sun)

The cause of a fire that damaged 16 apartments on Smith Level Road was still under investigation Tuesday as residents began the process of starting over. Read more: http://www.heraldsun.com/news/local/counties/orange-county/article193626079.html

Fire at Carrboro apartment complex displaces residents (WRAL)

A fire at an apartment complex in Carrboro displaced several residents Monday evening. Read more: http://www.wral.com/fire-at-carrboro-apartment-complex-displaces-residents/17243049/

Multiple Departments Get Carrboro Fire Under Control (WCHL)

Sixteen apartment units in Carrboro were damaged in a fire Monday evening. Read more: http://chapelboro.com/news/fire/multiple-departments-battle-carrboro-fire

Southern Hospitality Alive and Well in Chapel Hill, NC (North Hills Monthly)

You know you’re in the South when you’re sitting in front of a heaping plate of fried chicken, hush puppies, catfish, fried green tomatoes, barbecue, mac and cheese, turnip greens, squash casserole, cornbread…and more. Read more: http://www.northhillsmonthly.com/2018/01/01/163507/southern-hospitality-alive-and-well-in-chapel-hill-nc#.WlPfl7HNhD8.twitter

Chapel Hill Providing Update on Possible Estes Drive Police Station (WCHL)

Chapel Hill is holding a meeting Monday evening providing an update on the status of a proposed municipal service center on property owned by UNC. Read more: http://chapelboro.com/news/local-government/chapel-hill-providing-update-possible-estes-drive-police-station

 

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From Town Hall

 

 

PHOTO Martin Luther King Jr. 

Chapel Hill Celebrates Life and Legacy of Dr. King 

Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday Service Schedule

Most municipal offices will be closed Monday, Jan. 15, in observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. http://www.townofchapelhill.org/Home/Components/News/News/11932/22

 

Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration and Employee Sharing Event

Employees have held their own special observance of Dr. King’s legacy for 20 years and counting at the Town of Chapel Hill.

Usually held the Friday before the Monday holiday, the internal celebration has been nurtured by a dedicated group of Public Works employees led by Maggie Burnett and Fred Battle. At the urging of Town Manager Roger Stancil, the celebration has grown to include employees of all departments.

Employees gather to recognize Dr. King’s guiding principles of non-violence, brotherhood, justice, morality and action. Some employees entered a poetry contest, with the winning poems displayed during the month of February on Chapel Hill Transit buses.

Previous years’ employee celebrations are documented on the Town’s YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLr0THsJ38Jk-uFDRKaCosJrtx7-Y-3NTT.

 

Chapel Hill Marks 33 Years of Observing Dr. King’s Legacy

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday has been observed as a U.S. federal holiday since 1986.

Chapel Hill has observed the day as a town holiday since 1984. Chapel Hill was one of the first communities in North Carolina to declare Martin Luther King Jr. Day a municipal holiday.

 

Naming of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard

On May 8, 2005, the Town Council dedicated Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, which had been renamed from Airport Road. View the video (vimeo.com/83854787) that documented the ceremony and subsequent procession to Hargraves Center (where Dr. King had visited 45 years earlier – on May 8, 1960).

It was a day of fellowship and brotherhood for our community. The video includes interviews of Bill Thorpe, Fred Battle, Eugene Farrar, Nate Davis, Delores Clark, Garland King Jr., Lillian Lee, Jamie Riggsbee, Marie Mann, Annie Butzen, Jen Gard, Maria Palmer, Creighton Irons, Eleanor Murray and others.

 

Community Celebrations Honoring Dr. King

 

UNC-Chapel Hill MLK Week of Celebration

UNC will host several events including:

  • Sunday, Jan. 14: University/Community MLK Banquet at the Friday Center
  • Monday, Jan. 15: MLK Day of Service 5K at the Campus Y
  • Tuesday, Jan. 16: Unity Dinner at the Great Hall and “He Was a Poem, He Was a Song” at Stone Center
  • Wednesday, Jan. 17: Candlelight Vigil—Warriors of Freedom a the Stone Center Amphitheater
  • Thursday, Jan. 18: MLK Celebration Keynote Lecture and Awards Ceremony at Memorial Hall

 

More information and details at diversity.unc.edu/mlk

 

MLK Day Rally and March at Peace and Justice Plaza

A rally led by the UNC College Chapter and Chapel Hill- Carrboro NAACP Youth Council begins at 9 a.m. Monday, Jan. 15, at the Peace and Justice Plaza, 179 E. Franklin St. The featured speaker is Quinton Harper, an activist and community organizer. Followed with a march to First Baptist Church.

At 10 a.m., there will be coffee and conversation on “MLK 50 Years Later.” From 11 to 12:30 p.m., there will be a commemorative church service with NC Senator Valerie Foushee as keynote speaker.

https://www.chapelhillcarrboronaacp.com/events-1/mlk-day-rally-and-march-at-peace-and-justice-plaza

 

An Evening with Regina Gale and Dr. King

Regina Gale, author, poet and speaker, will entertain with powerful readings, an array of jazzy songs, uplifting stories of hope and the message to never stop dreaming.

The free event will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 17, at the Seymour Center in Chapel Hill, 2551 Homestead Road. Register by Wednesday, Jan. 10, by calling (919) 968-2070.

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Town-Sponsored Events

 

 

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Community Conversations with Foreign-Born Residents of Chapel Hill

A series of community conversations are scheduled in Chapel Hill over the next several weeks to hear from foreign-born and refugee community members about their experiences, challenges and ideas for town services and programming. 

The Community Conversations are part of the Building Integrated Communities Project. Chapel Hill was selected as one of two municipalities for the Building Integrated Communities (BIC) Initiative. BIC is housed at UNC, within the Latino Migration Project and is supported by funding from the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation. 

Following an assessment of community demographics, project leaders will move on to devise strategies to strengthen relationships, address community-identified issues, and support foreign-born residents’ civic engagement and leadership in Chapel Hill’s local government. 

Community Conversations are scheduled as follows:

Tuesday, January 16      9 - 10:30 a.m. 

Seymour Senior Center 2551 Homestead Rd, Chapel Hill, 27516

Conversations in Mandarin, Korean, and English Languages

www.facebook.com/events/746439692232004/

 

Saturday, January 20      11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Chapel Hill Public Library 100 Library Drive, Chapel Hill, 27514

Conversations in Arabic, Burmese, Russian, & English Languages;

Childcare provided

www.facebook.com/events/300599903677555/

 

Thursday, February 15       7 - 8:30 p.m.

St. Thomas More Catholic Church 940 Carmichael St, Chapel Hill, 27514

Spanish & English languages; Childcare provided

BIC is a multi-year planning process that helps NC local governments successfully engage with local foreign-born, refugee, and Hispanic/Latinx residents in order to improve relationships, enhance communication, and promote civic participation and leadership in local government.  As a result of working with BIC, local governments and diverse community stakeholders gain tools and build capacity to generate locally relevant strategies for promoting economic development and strengthening educational advancement.  Since 2010, the statewide BIC initiative has partnered with the cities of Greenville, High Point, Winston-Salem, and Sanford to create and implement four citywide action plans for improving the socio-economic integration of newcomers.

For more information about the Chapel Hill BIC Project, contact:

Sarah Viñas, Assistant Director of the Chapel Hill Office of Housing & Community, at
svinas@townofchapelhill.org / +1 919-969-5079 (habla español)

 

Click here for information in Russian.

Click here for information in Mandarin.

Click here for information in Arabic.

Click here for information Burmese.

Click here for information in Korean.

 

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Honoring Frederick Douglass' 200th Birthday

Several organizations and community groups are planning events in 2018 to commemorate the 200th birthday of Frederick Douglass through music, readings from his autobiography and several visionary art performances.

The series kicks off Jan. 18 with a community celebration at the United Church of Chapel Hill. Visionary artist Tarish Pipkins, aka Jeghetto, will unveil his newest creation, a Frederick Douglass puppet and multi-media performance. Mary D. Williams, acclaimed gospel singer and scholar, will celebrate Douglass by singing the story of the African-American experience - from slavery to abolition and beyond.

“Frederick Douglass was a transformative figure within the development and history of this nation,” said James E. Williams, Jr., former public defender for Orange County and a member of the committee planning the bicentennial events throughout the county. “He escaped from slavery and became one of the critical figures in propelling this nation toward the abolition of slavery. In those bleak times, he had a vision and a hope for a better life, and he fought for that. He was truly a remarkable person whose contributions to our nation deserve to be celebrated.”

Douglass was born in February 1818, although his exact birth date was not recorded. Congress approved and President Trump signed legislation in November creating the Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Commission as part of a nationwide celebration of the 200th birthday of the famed 19th-century abolitionist, writer and public servant.

The events are funded by Orange County, the Town of Chapel Hill, the Town of Carrboro, the Chapel Hill-Carrboro branch of the NAACP, the UNC Center for the Study of the American South, Orange Organizing Against Racism and Marion Phillips.

As part of the celebration, the organizations purchased 1,000 copies of a commemorative edition of "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave." The books will be distributed throughout the community, with an emphasis on youth, as part of the national One Million Abolitionists effort led by the Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives.

The FDFI is seeking to print one million hardcover copies of the book in 2018 to be given to young people, who will be asked to create service projects to address an urgent social justice issue present in their community.         

Scheduled Events

All the events listed below are open to the public and free of charge. More events are being planned, including an appearance from Frederick Douglass' great-great-great grandson, Kenneth B. Morris, Jr., and will be added to the website as they are finalized.

Frederick Douglass at 200 Kickoff Celebration

Featuring Tarish “Jeghetto” Pipkins and Mary D. Williams

Thursday, January 18th, 7 p.m.

United Church of Chapel Hill

Kick off a community-wide celebration of the life and legacy of Frederick Douglass with an evening of art and song. Visionary artist Tarish Pipkins, aka Jeghetto, will unveil his newest creation, a Frederick Douglass puppet and multi-media performance. Mary D. Williams, acclaimed gospel singer and scholar, will celebrate Douglass by singing the story of the African-American experience - from slavery to abolition and beyond.

Town of Carrboro celebrates Douglass at 200

Monday, February 5th, 7 p.m.

Carrboro Century Center

Who was Frederick Douglass and why is he so important to us today? Join us as we celebrate the 200th anniversary of the birth of Frederick Douglass with presentations from James E. Williams Jr.,retired Orange/Chatham Chief Public Defender, Michelle Lanier, Executive Director of the North Carolina African American Heritage Commission, and Jaki Shelton Green, award-winning poet. Light refreshments provided.

Brightstar Theater presents Frederick Douglass

Sunday, February 11

2 p.m. Chapel Hill Public Library

4 p.m. Hargraves Community Center

Celebrate a hero of American History with this production from a highly acclaimed touring theater company. This show – best for 4th graders through adults – highlights Douglass’ awe-inspiring life, from his escape from a Maryland plantation to his days as a newspaper publisher and celebrates both the power of education and a life of courage.

Frederick Douglass: Then and Now

Thursday, February 22, 7 p.m.

Chapel Hill Public Library, Meeting Room B

What would Frederick Douglass think of 2018? What did his contemporaries think of him? What was Douglass’s impact, then and now? A panel of scholars, including Reginald Hildebrand and Patrick Horn will consider and comment on these questions and more. Join us for this town/gown special event, co-sponsored by Carolina Public Humanities.

Reading Douglass in Public

Wednesday, February 28, 6-8 p.m.

Orange County Public Library Main Library

Join local authors, poets, historians and social justice advocates as they read from Douglass’ The Narrative.

Discuss “The Narrative”

Monday, March 5, 6:30-7:30 p.m.

Orange County Public Library Main Library

The First Monday Classics Book Club led by local authors from Hillsborough will discuss The Narrative. No need to register or be a member of the book club. Just come on by!

For more information contact Orange County Community Relations Director Todd McGee at (919) 245-2302 or tmcgee@orangecountync.gov.

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OUR FRIEND MONA 

Meet the Author Tea on Jan. 18 Features Azadeh and Mark Perry

The Friends of the Library are pleased to present Azadeh and Mark Perry at a Meet the Author Tea on Thursday, Jan. 18 in Meeting Room B at the Chapel Hill Public Library. The event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served at 3:30 p.m., and the program will run from 4 to 5 p.m.

It is one thing to read headlines about the horrors of what has gone on in Iran and what religious persecution means.  It is quite another to hear about it from someone who has been there and known the people who inspired those international headlines.  It is an eye and mind opening experience to learn how those headlines actually affected the people who were involved.

The authors of Our Friend Mona are a husband and wife who live in Chapel Hill and work at UNC.  Azadeh Rohanian Perry is the Business Services Coordinator in the UNC School of Dentistry in the Pediatric Department.  Her husband, Mark Perry, is a playwright who teaches in UNC’s Department of Dramatic Art and also works as a Continuing Education Specialist for the Friday Center. 

Azadeh, a name meaning “freedom” in the Persian language (Farsi), was a close friend of Mona’s when both girls were growing up in Shiraz, one of the most beautiful cities in Iran.  Azadeh’s family moved when she was 16 and after that she dreamed repeatedly of people who suffered and died for their faith. 

Our Friend Mona is set in Iran and provides insight into the Bahá’í Faith and the campaign of persecution of this religion in Iran where the highest concentration of Bahá’í live.  Using interviews and Mona’s mother’s written account, Azadeh and Mark tell the story of the events in the short life of Mona.  The subtitle of the book is The Remarkable Life of a Young Martyr.  Mark is also the author of a play about Mona called A New Dress for Mona (Drama Circle, 2015). 

The story of sixteen-year-old Mona takes place between 1979 and 1983 following the 1979 Islamic Revolution when Iran became an Islamic Republic.  During the aftermath of the revolution, Bahá’í leaders and whole families were arrested.  Mona’s father was executed; her mother, and she herself were imprisoned and charged with being international spies.  On June 18, 1983, ten women were executed after failing to recant their faith.  Mona was the youngest at 16.  News media around the world reported the ill-treatment, confiscation of property and executions.  Many governments including our own condemned Iran’s behavior.  The United Nations made a resolution in support of the Bahá’í.

 

DETAILS AT-A-GLANCE

Who:        Friends of the Chapel Hill Public Library

What:      Meet the Author Tea: Azadeh & Mark Perry

Free and Open to the Public

Where:    Chapel Hill Public Library Meeting Room B

When:  Thursday, Jan. 18     3:30 p.m. Refreshments; 4-5 p.m. Program

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Town Services

 

 

PHOTO Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday Service Schedule

Most municipal offices will be closed Monday, Jan. 15, in observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

RESIDENTIAL REFUSE COLLECTION: No trash collection Jan. 15. Monday routes will be collected Wednesday, Jan. 17.

CURBSIDE RECYCLING: No change in schedule.

COMMERCIAL REFUSE COLLECTION: No trash collection Monday, Jan. 15. Monday’s trash will be collected by the end of the week.

ORANGE COUNTY LANDFILL will be closed Jan. 14-15.

SOLID WASTE CONVENIENCE CENTERS will be closed.

CHAPEL HILL TRANSIT will operate on a Saturday schedule on Jan. 15. The CM, CW, D, FG, JN, T and V routes will operate. The U, NU, 420 Hillsborough Express and Safe Rides will not operate. EZ Rider will operate from 8:15 a.m.-6:52 p.m. Transit offices will be closed. For schedule information, call 919-485-7433.

During the Martin Luther King Jr. Day Rally and March, Chapel Hill Transit routes will be detoured from around 9-10 a.m on Franklin Street as follows:

  • CW route - detoured along Cameron Avenue and Merritt Mill Road
  • D route - detoured along Hillsborough Street and Rosemary Street
  • FG route - detoured along Cameron Avenue and Pittsboro Street

Expect schedule delays during this time.

HOUSING: Office and Maintenance Division will be closed. For emergency maintenance services, call 919-968-2855.

CHAPEL HILL PUBLIC LIBRARY will be open from 1 to 5 p.m.

PARKING SERVICES: The Parking office will be closed. No municipal parking enforcement.

PARKS AND RECREATION: The Plant Road office will be closed. Call facilities for schedules: Chapel Hill Community Center (919-968-2790); Hargraves Recreation Center (919-968-2794); Homestead Aquatics Center (919-968-2799); The Corner Teen Center (919-968-2841).

For more information on Town Holidays, visit www.townofchapelhill.org/holiday.

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SPECIAL OLYMPICS SWIMMERS 

Special Olympics Orange County seeks swim team volunteers

All practices will be held at the Chapel Hill Community Center

Our SOOC winter/spring swim team seeks knowledgeable aquatics volunteers for our competitive swim team.  We train a small group of dedicated swimmers who are focused on improving their skills through rigorous practices and competition.

All practices will be held at the Chapel Hill Community Center on 120 S. Estes Dr.

Thursday practices will begin on Jan 18 and run 6-7p, and 7:10-8:25p.  Thursday nights we share the pool with another swim team, and focus on endurance lap swimming.  

Sunday practices will begin on March 11 and run 6-7:30p.  On Sundays we have the full pool so can work on skills development and give athletes 1:1 instruction to improve their competitive ability.  

All practices will end on Sunday, May 27.  SONC Summer Games is in Raleigh, June 1-3, although the team may attend an out of state tournament instead.

Coaches may elect to attend all 3 weekly sessions, or select the one(s) that fits their schedule best.    

To register, please contact Colleen Lanigan, Coordinator, at clanigan@townofchapelhill.org or 919-968-2810 by January 31.

 

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Leaf Collection

Place loose leaves/pine straw, free of limbs and debris, at the back of the curb for collection. Keep leaves out of streets, gutters and ditches to prevent flooding and bike and car accidents. Do not block sidewalks, fire hydrants, mailboxes, storm drains or water meters or interfere with sight distances at intersections.

For more information on leaf collection, visit www.townofchapelhill.org/leaves.

 

Jan. 14-20

Section VI - Fountain Ridge Road, Colony Woods Drive, Cricket Ground, White Oak Drive, Legion Road, Clover Drive, Standish Drive, Windhover Drive, Englewood Drive, Silver Creek Trail, Chesley Lane, Sweeten Creek Road area

Section VII - Huntington Drive, Curtis Road, Elliott Road, Old Oxford Road, Ridgecrest Road, South Lake Shore Drive, North Lake Shore Drive, Kensington Drive, Brookview Drive, Shady Lawn Road, Honeysuckle Road, Booker Creek Road, Foxwood Drive area

Section III - Caswell Road, Granville Road, Burlage Circle, Meadowbrook Drive, Mount Bolus Road, Bolinwood Drive, Mill Race, North Street, Cobb Terrace, Boundary Street, Tenney Circle, Battle Lane, Elizabeth Street, Glendale Drive area

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Transportation

 

 

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Transit Detours and Holiday Schedule Monday, Jan. 15

Chapel Hill Transit will operate a Saturday schedule on Monday, Jan. 15, 2018, in observance of the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday.  The CM, CW, D, FG, JN, T and V routes will operate. The U, NU, 420 Hillsborough Express and Safe Rides will not operate.

EZ Rider will operate from 8:15 a.m.-6:52 p.m. Transit offices will be closed and will reopen at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 16. For schedule information, call 919-485-7433.

Due to the Martin Luther King Jr. Day Rally and March on Monday, Jan. 15, Chapel Hill Transit will detour routes from approximately 9-10 a.m. on Franklin Street as follows:

  • CW route - detoured along Cameron Avenue and Merritt Mill Road
  • D route - detoured along Hillsborough Street and Rosemary Street
  • FG route - detoured along Cameron Avenue and Pittsboro Street

Expect schedule delays during this time.

More information: chtransit.org

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Tar Heel Express Service to the North Carolina vs. Clemson Basketball Game Jan. 16

Chapel Hill Transit will provide Tar Heel Express shuttle service on Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018, for the North Carolina basketball game against Clemson, scheduled for 7 p.m. at Dean E. Smith Center. 

Tar Heel Express shuttles will begin at 5:30 p.m. from the park and rides located at Friday Center, Southern Village, Airport Drive (103 Airport Drive, Chapel Hill) and Jones Ferry. Shuttles will also be available from the Carolina Coffee Shop located at 138 East Franklin Street (no parking provided). 

The shuttles will provide continuous and fully accessible service, running every 10 to 15 minutes between the park and rides and the Dean E. Smith Center. The shuttles will operate for approximately forty-five (45) minutes following the game.

Shuttles drop off and pick up on Bowles Drive in front of the Dean E. Smith Center. Shuttle rides are $5 for a round-trip or $3 for a one-way trip.

Park and ride permits are not required during Tar Heel Express events.

For additional information on Tar Heel Express, please visit Chapel Hill Transit's website at chtransit.org, email chtransit@townofchapelhill.org, or call a customer service representative at 919-485-7433.

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CHAPEL HILL TRANSIT BUS

Tar Heel Express Service to the North Carolina vs. Georgia Tech Basketball Game Jan. 20

Chapel Hill Transit will provide Tar Heel Express shuttle service on Saturday, Jan. 20, 2018, for the North Carolina basketball game against Georgia Tech, scheduled for 2 p.m. at Dean E. Smith Center.

Tar Heel Express shuttles will begin at 12:30 p.m. from the park and rides located at Friday Center, Southern Village, Airport Drive (103 Airport Drive, Chapel Hill) and Jones Ferry. Shuttles will also be available from the Carolina Coffee Shop located at 138 East Franklin Street (no parking provided).

The shuttles will provide continuous and fully accessible service, running every 10 to 15 minutes between the park and rides and the Dean E. Smith Center. The shuttles will operate for approximately forty-five (45) minutes following the game.

Shuttles drop off and pick up on Bowles Drive in front of the Dean E. Smith Center. Shuttle rides are $5 for a round-trip or $3 for a one-way trip.

Park and ride permits are not required during Tar Heel Express events.

For additional information on Tar Heel Express, please visit Chapel Hill Transit's website at chtransit.org, email chtransit@townofchapelhill.org, or call a customer service representative at 919-485-7433.

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News from Durham-Chapel Hill-Carrboro Metropolitan Planning Organization 

Do you Have Feedback on Transportation Priorities?

Feedback Requested by February 9

DURHAM, N.C. – The Durham-Chapel Hill-Carrboro Metropolitan Planning Organization (DCHC MPO) is seeking public feedback on the proposed 2045 Metropolitan Transportation Plan (MTP) report, which will drive future policies and decision-making processes for highway, bicycle, pedestrian, and transit projects.

Residents and stakeholders can now review and provide input on the proposed 2045 MTP, which shows the highway, bus transit, rail transit and other transportation projects to be implemented over the next 30 years, and presents the official demographic forecasts and regional travel model.  Visit the DCHC MPO Website and provide comments directly by email by Feb. 9.

The final 2045 MTP and full report is scheduled to be adopted in February, which will include projects for consideration to receive state and federal funding through the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP). 

For more information about the 2045 MTP, contact Andy Henry with the City of Durham Transportation Department at (919) 560-4366, ext. 36419 or by email. Stakeholders and residents are also encouraged to like the DCHC MPO Facebook page and follow the DCHC MPO Twitter feed to stay up-to-date on news about transportation planning efforts for Durham, Orange, and Chatham counties.

 

About the Durham-Chapel Hill-Carrboro Metropolitan Planning Organization

The DCHC MPO is responsible for planning and programming state and federal transportation projects in all of Durham County and the urbanized areas of Orange County and Chatham County.  Citizens are encouraged to visit the DCHC MPO Website to get involved in the transportation planning process or attend an MPO Board meeting, the second Tuesday of each month, 9am, in Durham City Hall.

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Public Safety News

 

 

Fire Truck Engine 31 

Wreath Comes Down, Sentiment Continues

The Chapel Hill Fire Department added one red bulb to the wreath that hung at Fire Station No. 1 at 403 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd for the month of December and is asking the community to keep fire prevention in the forefront of your minds as the winter months roll on.

The wreath was removed Jan. 1. The red bulb was added due to a minor fire in a residence on Dec. 22; a mattress caught fire and was extinguished before firefighters arrived. The cause of the fire is unknown.

Although the wreath is no longer visible, you can help us keep the idea behind the “Keep the Wreath Green” campaign going by using the following safety tips:

  • NEVER use your stove, over, or grill to heat your home;
  • NEVER leave candles unattended;
  • Keep cords clear of walkways, which could present tripping hazards; and
  • Avoid the use of drop cords (extension cords) for indoor and extended use;

For additional fire, life safety and consumer product information and interactive materials, please visit the below web sites:

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Chapel Hill Police, Fire Successfully Reverse Overdose with Naloxone

The Chapel Hill police and fire departments responded to an apparent overdose of heroin Friday and issued Naloxone to the person for a successful overdose reversal.

Police officers were dispatched to a cardiac arrest. Upon arrival, it was evident that the person was suffering from an overdose, and officers administered one dose of Naloxone.

Firefighters arrived a short time later and noticed the person was still unresponsive. A second dose of Naloxone was administered by a firefighter, which improved the person’s conditions. Orange County Emergency Services arrived and transported the individual to UNC Hospitals for additional treatment.

The Chapel Hill Police Department has been certified to deliver Naloxone since August 2015; this is not the first time it’s been used to reverse the effects of an overdose.

The Chapel Hill Fire Department became certified to deliver Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) Level of Service June 1, 2017. The program required two years of training and preparation.

With the EMT level of service, firefighters are now able to provide more advanced ways of ventilating and oxygenating patients suffering from respiratory complications and provide medications to patients in anaphylaxis, asthma attacks or opioid overdoses, including the delivery of Naloxone for overdoses.

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