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Chapel Hill eNews

Post Date:05/11/2017 3:05 PM
Chapel Hill eNews

The e-newsletter of the Town of Chapel Hill offers a fresh update each week! Signing up -- or, changing your subscription preferences - is easy at www.townofchapelhill.org/signup.

Stay connected with us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube - and via our weekly newspaper ads in the Chapel Hill News.

For more information, including media inquiries and requests for hi-res photos, please contact us at info@townofchapelhill.org.

 

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Up Front

 

2016_winter_commencement

Congratulations to the class of 2017, turning their tassels on Sunday. We wish you the best of luck in your future endeavors and hope that you'll always call Chapel Hill home.

From Town Hall

Town-Sponsored Events

Town Services

Transportation

Public Safety

News from Other Public Agencies

 

 

Up Front

 

 

TOWNweek has been posted!

www.townofchapelhill.org/townweek

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Southern-Village 

Things to do in Chapel Hill

Feature from the Chapel Hill/Orange CountyVisitors Bureau

2nd Friday ArtWalk 
Friday, May 12
6 to 9 p.m.

With 21 events on the 2nd Friday ArtWalk this month, it's a great time to shop for Moms and grads!
The 2nd Friday ArtWalk lets you experience the creative arts scene in our community, explore venues, and socialize with other art lovers on the ArtWalk. Buy local art in all mediums; handmade jewelry, scarves, paper goods, ceramics, fine art, and more.

2nd Friday ArtWalk events and activities are free and open to all.

For complete information on these events, visit www.2ndFridayArtWalk.com  

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Stream 

Town in News

Town in News – TIN Report – is a sampling of news media coverage about the Town of Chapel Hill compiled by the Communications and Public Affairs Department. This listing includes articles and columns that are available on the web, and may not necessarily contain all stories in the print edition of the papers or on televised broadcasts.

Links access online stories that are posted for a limited time. Some media organizations require registration or a subscription.

For information, contact us at info@townofchapelhill.org

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Chapel Hill Officials Affirm Support for UNC Center for Civil Rights (Chapelboro.com)

An advocacy group that also serves as a training vehicle for law students at UNC-Chapel Hill may come screeching to a halt by order of university system officials. Read more: http://chapelboro.com/news/local-government/chapel-hill-officials-affirm-support-unc-center-civil-rights

 

Pedestrian Safety on MLK Boulevard to Increase (ABC 11)

Chapel Hill is working to boost pedestrian safety along MLK Boulevard after officials said accidents have increased since 2016. Read more: http://abc11.com/news/pedestrian-safety-on-mlk-boulevard-to-increase-/1973255/

 

Proposal Calls for 273 Apartment Units on Fordham Boulevard (Chapelboro.com)

A new apartment complex may be coming to the Ephesus-Fordham District in Chapel Hill. Read more: http://chapelboro.com/news/development/proposal-calls-273-apartment-units-fordham-boulevard

 

Chapel Hill Town Council pushes for more affordable housing spending in budget (The Herald-Sun)

Town Council members made it clear Monday that they want to put a significant amount of money into affordable housing. Read more: http://www.heraldsun.com/news/local/counties/orange-county/article149455269.html

 

$106.8M Chapel Hill budget spends more on transit, stormwater (The Herald-Sun)

Next year’s proposed $106.8 million budget continues existing town services, sets a new property tax rate and spends more on stormwater improvements and Chapel Hill Transit. Read more: http://www.heraldsun.com/news/local/counties/orange-county/article149419384.html

 

Construction Bringing New Crosswalks to MLK Blvd in Chapel Hill (Chapelboro.com)

Road construction aimed toward pedestrian safety is ongoing on Martin Luther King Junior Boulevard in Chapel Hill. Read more: http://chapelboro.com/news/safety/construction-bringing-new-crosswalks-mlk-blvd-chapel-hill

 

Chapel Hill adding new crosswalks and improving sidewalks (WNCN)

Drivers in Chapel Hill will need to be on the lookout for some construction as the town works to make things safer for pedestrians. Read more: http://wncn.com/2017/05/07/chapel-hill-adding-new-crosswalks-and-improving-sidewalks/

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From Town Hall

 

 

15-17council-body 

Council Meeting Summary Including Manager's Recommended Budget

Council meeting summaries are issued from the Communications and Public Affairs Department following most business meetings. To sign up to receive these by email, please send a request to info@townofchapelhill.org. This brief summary is sent immediately following the public meeting. It should not be viewed as official minutes.

Would you like to view the Council video? (townofchapelhill.org/councilvideo - this should be ready for online viewing by Thursday afternoon).

Support for UNC Center for Civil Rights
The Council adopted a resolution of support for the UNC Center for Civil Rights. The Town’s Justice in Action Committee petitioned the Council to pass such a resolution at the April 24, 2017, business meeting. The University of North Carolina Board of Governors is considering a policy that would prevent the Center from undertaking any litigation. The UNC Center for Civil Rights, founded in 2001, has worked on matters of justice, prosperity and opportunity for all members of the community. Its mission is to use community based impact advocacy and legal education and scholarship to advance strategies that secure social, economic and environmental justice for low wealth, minority families and neighborhoods.

Funding for Botanical Garden Foundation Property Purchase
The Council approved providing $50,000 in matching funds toward the purchase of the Cochrane Property, which is adjacent to the protected open space network along Morgan Creek, and authorize the Town Manager to execute an agreement with the Botanical Garden Foundation, Inc.

Appointments to Town Boards and Commissions
The Council made a recommendation to the Orange County Board of Commissioners for an appointment of a Chapel Hill resident to the Orange County Animal Services Advisory Board. The Council also appointed applicants to vacancies on the Community Design Commission, the Environmental Stewardship Advisory Board, the Housing Advisory Board, the Planning Commission, and the Transportation and Connectivity Advisory Board.

2017-18 Town Manager’s Recommended Budget
No Reductions or Additions to Core Services; Commitment to Affordable Housing
The Council received Town Manager Roger Stancil’s recommended budget for Fiscal Year 2017-2018. For the fourth consecutive year, the proposed budget calls for no tax increase, thanks to prudent financial planning and expected growth in sales tax revenues.

The Town’s proposed $106.8 million budget for all funds represents a net increase of 1.5 percent to maintain existing service levels and address Council goals and priorities.

The proposed budget includes no changes in core services, which are highly valued as reflected in the biennial community survey. The proposal also includes resources to advance the Councils strategic priorities and accomplish adopted Goals.

In the budget highlights presented to Council, Town Manager Stancil said: “While we continue to experience positive growth in economy driven revenues, our property tax base, which is our largest revenue source, has not kept pace with our costs of providing services over the last eight years. Moreover, the Town now faces legislative threats on both the state and federal level. The state Legislature is considering actions, such as changing the distribution method of sales taxes that will reduce the Town’s revenues without providing options to make up the loss.”

What to Expect in Tax Bills under Proposed Budget
The Orange County County-wide revaluation of real property will go into effect for fiscal 2018 tax year. While individual taxpayers will see their tax bill change depending on the change in the valuation of their property, the Town is adopting a revenue neutral tax rate that is designed to generate the same revenue as the previous year. In other words, for the average tax-payer Town taxes will stay about the same. However, most taxpayers are not average and will see some change in their bill based on change in the assessed value of their property. The recommended revenue neutral tax rate is 50.80 cents per $100 of assessed valuation, reduced from 52.4 cents in the current year. The following table illustrates the calculation of Town taxes using the revenue neutral tax rate for a hypothetical average taxpayer.

The total amount Chapel Hill residents pay in property taxes also depends on the actions of the Board of Orange County Commissioners, which set the county tax rate, and the special schools tax for Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools. The property tax bill that Chapel Hill residents pay is divided among Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools (54 percent), the Town of Chapel Hill (33 percent), and Orange County (13 percent). Residents who live in the Durham County portion of Chapel Hill see slightly different tax bills due to the actions of the Durham County Commissioners.

Commitment to Affordable Housing

The recommended budget continues the Town Council’s commitment to affordable housing programs with an amount equal to one cent on the tax rate or $688,395. In total, the Town spends about $5.2 million annually on affordable housing programs including management of 336 dwelling units in 13 public housing neighborhoods. The Housing Fund Budget reflects a 5.6 percent decrease in capital expenditures and an expected 12.4 percent decrease in subsidies from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The President’s preliminary budget proposes elimination of the Community Development Block Grant and HOME Program and a reduction in funds allocated for public housing maintenance and operations.

Stormwater Fees
A $6 increase in the annual stormwater fee is included in the recommended budget. The increase will be used to fund operating costs and to pay for debt service on stormwater general obligation bonds that will be issued to fund priority infrastructure improvement projects including those identified in the Lower Booker Creek Subwatershed Study.

Planning for the Future
The proposed budget includes a number of initiatives to plan for the community’s future, including a rewrite of the Land Use Management Ordinance, beginning implementation of the West Rosemary Street Development Guide, developing the Mobility and Connectivity Plan, and considering the Ephesus-Fordham District Design Guidelines. Council committees are also reviewing the Town’s properties to make recommendations to the Council for future use of the Historic Town Hall, the American Legion Property, and a number of other Town properties and assets.

For Employees
The Town believes that the excellent service that residents and visitors receive is dependent on attracting and retaining excellent employees. Town Manager Stancil is recommending a 2.5 percent salary adjustment. The adjustment will be based on the market rate (mid-point) within each pay grade so that employees currently making less than market will receive slightly larger percentage increases than those currently making more than the market. Additional pay adjustments are proposed to meet the Orange County Living Wage standards for 2018 and to implement the findings of a market survey for compensation primarily affecting Public Works and Transit employees. Anticipated is a 12.3 percent increase in the cost of employee medical insurance. The Town will continue its focus on improving employee health via the Wellness @ Work program, a partnership with the UNC Health Care Department of Family Medicine.

Budget Reflects Our Shared Vision
“The budget is the tool we use to allocate resources that move us toward a future based on our shared vision,” Town Manager Stancil said. “But, moreover, the budget is about choices. Choices dictated by factors both within and outside of our control. Our ability to understand, manage and anticipate these factors is greatly enhanced by our ability to build trust and respect through open communication and the participation of the public in our planning, goal setting and decision making processes.”

More Information
The Council sets its strategic priorities throughout the year, and especially in regular work session discussion and at the annual retreat in January. A complete list of budget-related materials and meetings are provided at www.townofchapelhill.org/budget.

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PEOPLE WALKING ON FRANKLIN STREET 

Downtown Chapel Hill Gets a Makeover for Mother’s Day and UNC Graduation

Preparing for thousands of anticipated visitors on Mother’s Day and UNC-Chapel Hill graduation weekend May 13-14, downtown Chapel Hill is putting on a shine.

Spring cleaning and maintenance in downtown Chapel Hill includes:

  • installing WELCOME to Downtown banners
  • cleaning and pressure washing of streets, sidewalks and trash receptacles
  • planting and mulching in raised brick planters on the 100 East Franklin Street including Columbia Streets
  • picking up litter from sidewalks and parking lots
  • putting up new flags at Town Hall and the Post Office
  • painting public art on signal boxes – including one at Rosemary and Robinson streets
  • paying special clean-up and maintenance attention to Town-maintained cemeteries
  • proactively checking and repairing downtown lighting
  • devoting extra time to identifying and addressing graffiti
  • mowing along Martin Luther King Jr Boulevard, Fordham Boulevard and South Road/Raleigh Road

Bringing out the beauty of Chapel Hill’s downtown is a team effort among Public Works and Parks & Recreation departments, the Chapel Hill Police Department, and the Chapel Hill Downtown Partnership. 

Looking for fun things to do in downtown this weekend? visit www.downtownchapelhill.com 

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towns_county_nc_clean_energy 

Collaboration Encourages Solar Energy Growth
Local and State Affiliation Yields National Recognition

To receive SolSmart designation, communities must take action to reduce solar “soft costs,” which are non-hardware costs that can increase the time and money it takes to install a solar energy system. Reducing these costs leads to savings that are passed on to consumers. Examples of soft costs include planning and zoning; permitting, interconnection, and inspection; financing; customer acquisition and installation labor.  

As part of their bronze designations Orange County, Chapel Hill and Carrboro are collaborating with the NCCETC on two training workshops for local governments: New Trends in Solar Permitting and Inspections and Solar Fire and Safety. Each of the three communities have also developed an online checklist for solar permitting in their communities. “We are pleased to have the opportunity to work closely with Chapel Hill and Carrboro and hope to continue our mutual interests in supporting cleaner, safer communities,” remarked Brennan Bouma, Orange County Sustainability Coordinator.  

SolSmart provides no-cost technical assistance from a team of local and national solar experts to help cities and counties achieve designation. The NCCETC is working with the three Triangle communities to continue their efforts to adopt programs and processes that will lower soft costs and encourage solar energy growth. A SolSmart designation is a signal that a community is “open for solar business,” offering public recognition that the community is a favorable place for solar energy growth. SolSmart is open to all cities and counties across the nation. Other communities seeking to join the program can learn more at SolSmart.org.

 

For more information: 

NC Clean Energy Technology Center:  Shannon Helm, Senior Director, Communications
shannon_helm@ncsu.edu 

Orange County: Todd McGee, Community Relations Director
tmcgee@orangecountync.gov

Town of Chapel Hill: John Richardson, Planning Manager for Sustainability
jrichardson@townofchapelhill.org 

Town of Carrboro: Trish McGuire, Planning Director
pmcguire@townofcarrboro.org

 

About the NC Clean Energy Technology Center
The N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center, as part of the College of Engineering at North Carolina State University, advances a sustainable energy economy by educating, demonstrating and providing support for clean energy technologies, practices and policies. For more information about the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center, visit: nccleantech.ncsu.edu. Twitter: @NCCleanTech

About the Town of Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC, is a multicultural university town that is home to UNC-Chapel Hill and a resident population of 59,000. The Town of Chapel Hill is committed to enhancing both organizational and community sustainability. Policy and programming efforts include a LEED-based ordinance to ensure that all new or renovated Town facilities uphold sustainable building practices, a green fleets policy to reduce vehicle emissions, a fare free transit system, electric vehicle public charging stations to encourage zero-emissions driving, a tree protection ordinance to preserve the Town’s wooded character, a rural buffer for growth management, and districts for both watershed protection and resource conservation designed to maintain and enhance water quality. With more than 700 acres of parks and additional protected natural areas, Chapel Hill is sometimes referred to as town within a park. 

About the Town of Carrboro
Carrboro, NC, is a diverse and vibrant town located in southern Orange County, with a resident population of about 21,000.  Carrboro’s collaboration with Orange County and Chapel Hill to participate in SolSmart is a continuation of the Town’s long history and deep commitment to environmental protection and stewardship.  Other renewable energy examples include supporting the Solarize Carrboro campaign, which provided a foundation for other Solarize campaigns in North Carolina, and hosting a community solar project at the Town Commons.  More information on these and other clean energy topics is available at townofcarrboro.org/262/Sustainability-Energy-Climate-Change

About Orange County
Orange County, NC is home to more than 141,000 residents and represents the western end of the of North Carolina’s vibrant Research Triangle. With its deep roots in agriculture balancing its thriving urban areas and the nation’s oldest state university, Orange County has been helping to shape the commerce and political history of the region and nation since its founding in 1752. The County has long been committed to sustaining a high quality of life for both current and future generations with ongoing investments in a top-tier health system, a high quality transit network, watershed conservation, a network of public electric vehicle charging stations, and more than 3000 acres of protected lands.

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Town-Sponsored Events

 

 

LIVE AND LOCAL 

Kick Off Your Weekend with Live & Local on Friday

Live & Local, Chapel Hill’s free Music & Arts Series, has returned for its sixth season on the Plaza at 140 West Franklin St. The series features acts of all shapes and sizes from 6 to 9 p.m. on Fridays. Live & Local will deliver a wide array of performances throughout the season, ranging from American/folk harmonies to bluegrass.

On Friday, May 12, Speaks & Beats returns with poetry, spoken word, music and more.  Featured acts include Mariah M. and Yoni. Come and have your voice heard!

Downtown starts here! Don’t miss your opportunity to discover your new favorite musician, poet, or performer! The series runs Friday evenings through May 19. Live & Local is sure to delight, whether you’re listening to the melodies from the Plaza or from the porch of a nearby restaurant. The Plaza at 140 West Franklin creates an inviting experience for all, highlighted by 30,000 square feet of outdoor space, and a unique art sculpture titled Exhale.

Kick start your weekend with some of the most talented artists in the Piedmont. This year’s lineup is especially diverse and interactive, featuring musical acts Christiane and Ellis Dyson & The Shambles and activities including an Earth Day celebration, aerialists, caricature artists, balloon twisters, face painters, arts and crafts, and games. Be sure to experience the Live & Local Music and Arts Series and enjoy the natural charm and blend of culture unique to downtown Chapel Hill.

For more information, visit www.140westfranklinplaza.com/series.

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MOVIES UNDER THE STARS 

Chapel Hill’s Star Studded Summer Movie Series Kickoff at Boshamer Stadium on May 20

Let the stars be your guide all summer long!  The Town of Chapel Hill and Chapel Hill Downtown Partnership are excited to announce the FREE Movies Under the Stars summer series held outdoors on top of the Wallace Parking Deck at 150 E. Rosemary St. Movies Under the Stars shown in a unique, outdoor location where you can enjoy the night sky. Movie-goers of all ages will enjoy free popcorn and fun activities.

The series kicks-off on at 5:30 p.m Saturday, May 20, with a special baseball event at Boshamer Stadium at UNC after the last baseball game of the season vs. Duke.  The baseball game starts at 2 p.m. and the movie will begin 30 minutes after the end of the game, approximately 5:30 p.m.  A twitter contest was held by UNC Baseball and by popular vote the chosen movie is Field of Dreams.

The sports-themed series continues through Aug. 17 on different Thursday evenings each month at the Wallace Parking Deck, 150 E. Rosemary St. Movies and dates will be June 15 – Mighty Ducks; June 29 – Karate Kid; July 13 – Kicking & Screaming; July 27 – CARS; Aug. 10 – Space Jam; and Aug. 17 – Remember the Titans. Each event is free!

We hope to see you out at the movies!

For more information, please visit www.downtownchapelhill.com/movies.

The Town of Chapel Hill promotes a Bike & Pedestrian-Friendly Community and encourages everyone to cycle or walk to these great events! We also ask that you please bring your own lawn chairs and blankets for seating. There is ample bike parking on the Wallace Plaza. For all downtown parking options visit www.parkonthehill.com.

For questions contact Amanda Fletcher with the Town of Chapel Hill at (919) 968-2878 or afletcher@townofchapelhill.org or Meg McGurk with the Chapel Hill Downtown Partnership at (919) 967-9440 or meg@downtownchapelhill.com.

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B-1 HISTORICAL MARKER 

Integration Pioneers To Be Honored with State Historical Marker

The first African Americans to serve in the modern Navy at general rating will be honored with the dedication of a permanent historical marker on the 75th anniversary of their enlisting.

The marker, which will be installed at 10 a.m. Saturday, May 27 at the intersection of West Franklin and South Roberson streets, commemorates U.S. Navy Band B-1, which was attached to the Navy's PreFlight School on the UNC campus from July 1942 to April 1944.

Attending the installation ceremony will be two of the original members of B-1, Simeon Holloway of Las Vegas and Calvin Morrow of Greensboro, as well as many of the veterans' family members. Only four of the original 44 members of the band are still living. 

After the installation, a reception in B-1's honor will be held at the Hargraves Center at 216 N. Roberson Street. The marker dedication program and reception are both free and open to the public.

U.S. Navy B-1 was comprised primarily of young men who were enrolled at North Carolina A and T and Dudley High School. Enlistees also came from North Carolina Central, Hampton Institute, South Carolina State, Johnson C. Smith, and Hillside High School in Durham.

B-1 bandsmen were formally inducted into the Navy on May 27, 1942 at the Raleigh recruiting station. After training at Norfolk, they were transferred to Chapel Hill. Because of North Carolina's segregationist laws, the bandsmen could not live or be fed on campus. They were housed in a newly constructed community building on Roberson Street that is now the Hargraves Recreation Center.

Their service included daily marches from Hargraves to the UNC campus, where B-1 played for the raising of colors for the cadets every morning. These marches were big events for Chapel Hill's black community. Rebecca Clark, longtime Chapel Hill resident and Civil Rights advocate, vividly recalled for B-1's official history how wonderful it felt to see "all those handsome young men in their uniforms" marching to work. "The kids were out at every corner watching them parade. They were the best thing that could have happened to our community."

Rebecca Clark's son, John Clark, said, "Doug and I and all the kids in the neighborhood would run out to Roberson Street when we heard the band coming, and we followed them as far as we could."

The band's marching route would have taken them by the spot where the state's historical marker will be installed. 

During their service at Chapel Hill, B-1 bandsmen often played music for occasions that they would not have been allowed to attend because of their race. UNC-CH Chancellor James Moeser apologized to them in 2007 for how they were treated by the university during World War II, and at Kenan Stadium the bandsmen were made honorary members of the Marching Tar Heels.

Prior to B-1's service, blacks were limited to work in the Navy as cooks and porters.   B-1 was also the first Navy band to serve without having trained at the Navy's School of Music, which did not admit blacks. B-1 bandsmen were also the first African Americans to work on the UNC campus in jobs that did not involve cooking, cleaning and laundry work.

 

North Carolina's historical marker program is administered by the state's Department of Cultural Resources and the Department of Transportation. Since 1935, the program has erected over 1,500 state highway historical markers. The B-1 marker is the fourth to be installed in Chapel Hill, where markers also commemorate the founding of the University of North Carolina, the training of U.S. astronauts, and the 1947 Journey of Reconciliation. A Carrboro marker commemorating Elizabeth Cotten is about five blocks from where the B-1 marker will be installed.

The Visitors Center will open at 8:30 a.m. Saturday and will have a steel drum performer, photos from their historical files, coffee and refreshments. Free parking is available in the back.

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Town Services

 

 

 

 

 

Memorial Day Holiday

Most municipal offices will be closed Monday, May 29, in observance of Memorial Day.

RESIDENTIAL REFUSE COLLECTION: No residential trash collection on Monday. Monday routes will be collected Wednesday, May 31.

CURBSIDE RECYCLING: No change in schedule.

COMMERCIAL REFUSE COLLECTION: No change in schedule.

ORANGE COUNTY LANDFILL will be closed.

SOLID WASTE CONVENIENCE CENTERS will be closed.

CHAPEL HILL TRANSIT will not operate.

HOUSING: Office and Maintenance Division will be closed. For emergency maintenance services, call 919-968-2855.

CHAPEL HILL PUBLIC LIBRARY will be open from 1 to 5 p.m.

PARKING SERVICES: The Parking office will be closed. On-street metered parking and municipal lots will be free.

PARKS AND RECREATION: The Plant Road office will be closed.

For more information on Town Holidays, visit www.townofchapelhill.org/holiday.        

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Transportation

 

 

 

mlk_crosswalks-airport_dr-body 

Improving Pedestrian Safety on Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard

New crosswalks with refuge islands are coming to Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard to improve pedestrian safety at key locations along this busy thoroughfare.

The Town of Chapel Hill improvement project is funded with 2015 voter-approved bond funds totaling $170,000. These projects respond to requests from residents, Chapel Hill Transit, YMCA staff, and UNC Employees. They are consistent with the Town's interest of providing safe access for residents/visitors, especially in areas where we have high pedestrian and transit demand

The northern-most refuge island is located between Airport Drive and the Chapel Hill-Carrboro YMCA (south of Estes Drive). In addition to the crosswalk and refuge island, sidewalk improvements will be made along the north side of Airport Drive to complete the sidewalk out to the Chapel Hill Transit bus stop at the corner of Airport Drive and Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard.

The southern-most refuge island is located north of Bolinwood Drive in front of the Airport Gardens Apartments (north of the Chapel Hill Police Department).

People who drive are reminded to observe the speed limit of 35 miles per hour and to watch for people crossing this busy corridor.

The two new crosswalks connect with existing bus stops along the major north-south corridor for the Town’s fare-free transit system Chapel Hill Transit.

Construction will take place Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Lane closures will be in place; two-way traffic will be maintained. Work is scheduled to be completed by June 30, weather permitting.

Getting Around Chapel Hill
Do you walk, bike, run and wheel around Chapel Hill? The Town of Chapel Hill is busy with projects to improve your travel safety and convenience – including sidewalks, streets, trails and greenways, traffic calming and more. The Town’s focus on “complete streets” includes traffic slowing measures, public transit, and safe walkways and bike lanes.

Chapel Hill voters authorized $16.2 million in bonds funds in 2015 to repair, connect and construct sidewalks and bike lanes to improve connectivity and safety, and $5 million for the construction of new trails and greenways.

Learn more about efforts to make our community safer for all travelers atwww.townofchapelhill.org/GettingAround

Looking for more Traffic News?
Visit townofchapelhill.org/traffic. Did you know that traffic advisories may be sent directly to your email? Visit townofchapelhill.org/signup to sign up and check the box "Traffic Advisories." For assistance, contact us at info@townofchapelhill.org.

Are you on Twitter? Follow @ChapelHillGov, @ChapelHillPD and #CHTraffic for the latest traffic news.

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TRANSIT BUS GO HEELS

Tar Heel Express Shuttles to University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Commencement Ceremony

Chapel Hill Transit will provide Tar Heel Express shuttle service from 6:45 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sunday, May 14, 2017, for the UNC-Chapel Hill Commencement Ceremony at Kenan Stadium. Chapel Hill Transit shuttles will operate from the Friday Center (100 Friday Center Drive, Chapel Hill) park and ride lots to Kenan Stadium on Stadium Drive (Gate 2). Buses will run every 10 to 15 minutes, providing continuous and fully accessible service between the park and rides and Kenan Stadium. The shuttles and parking at the Friday Center will be FREE.

Riders, especially graduates, are encouraged to arrive at the park and ride lots at least one hour prior to the start of the 9:00 a.m. ceremony to allow for possible traffic delays.

For those wishing to stay on campus longer, Carolina Livery will provide shuttle service from 12:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Carolina Livery shuttles will loop campus making stops at the Student Union, the Old Well on Cameron Avenue and the Dean E. Smith Center and returning to the Friday Center park and ride lots.

For additional information on the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill Commencement Ceremony, please visit http://www.unc.edu/commencement/.

Follow on Twitter: @UNC @unc_2017 and #UNC17.

Chapel Hill Transit is the public transportation provider that serves Chapel Hill, Carrboro and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. For complete information about Chapel Hill Transit services, schedules, route changes or directions to the nearest Chapel Hill Transit stop, visit us at www.chtransit.org, email chtransit@townofchapelhill.org or call a customer service representative at 919-485-7433.

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Chapel Hill Transit Logo

Chapel Hill Transit May Service Schedule Adjustments

Chapel Hill Transit will make the following service schedule adjustments beginning Saturday, May 13 due to the University of North Carolina summer break schedule:

  • The weekend NU and U routes will not operate and will resume on Saturday, Aug. 12.
  • The weekday NU will not operate and will resume on Monday, Aug. 14.
  • The weekday A-Limited morning trips (7:14–9:44 a.m.) will not operate and will resume on Monday, Aug. 14.
  • EZ Rider will operate Monday-Friday from 5 a.m. to 11:17 p.m., Saturdays from 8:15 a.m. to 6:52 p.m. and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Sunday service will operate within the town limits of Chapel Hill and Carrboro on a space available basis. Reservations for Sunday service must be requested no later than 12 p.m. on the Friday prior to the requested Sunday service date). Reservations will be available from 1–5 p.m. on weekends.

Safe Ride routes will end on Saturday, April 29 and will resume on Thursday, Aug. 24.

Chapel Hill Transit is the public transportation provider that serves Chapel Hill, Carrboro and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. For complete information about Chapel Hill Transit services, schedules, route changes or directions to the nearest stop, visit us at www.chtransit.org , email chtransit@townofchapelhill.org, or call a customer service representative at 919-485-7433.

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ROAD CLOSED 

Long-Term Road Closure: South Road near UNC Student Stores

Contractors for UNC-Chapel Hill will close South Road to through traffic for utility repairs between Raleigh Street and Stadium Drive beginning May 15. The road is scheduled to reopen August 4, weather permitting.

Chapel Hill Transit will implement detours on the A, CCX, DX, FCX, FG, G, S, U and V routes on campus. Route detour information can be found at townofchapelhill.org/Home/Components/News/News/11067.

A detour map for motor-vehicle traffic is available at move.unc.edu/files/2017/05/southroad_car_detour.pdf; a detour map for people who use alternate forms of transportation is available at move.unc.edu/files/2017/05/southroad_bus_pedestrian.pdf.

For additional detour and project information, visit move.unc.edu/news/2017/05/05/south-road-closure.

Looking for more Traffic News?
Visit townofchapelhill.org/traffic. Did you know that traffic advisories may be sent directly to your email? Visit townofchapelhill.org/signup to sign up and check the box "Traffic Advisories." For assistance, contact us at info@townofchapelhill.org.

Do you walk, bike, run and wheel around Chapel Hill? The Town of Chapel Hill is busy with projects to improve your travel safety and convenience – including sidewalks, streets, trails and greenways, traffic calming and more. For more information, visit townofchapelhill.org/gettingaround. And, for a weekly digest of all Town news, sign up for Chapel Hill eNews at townofchapelhill.org/signup or by sending a request to info@townofchapelhill.org.

Are you on Twitter? Follow @ChapelHillGov@ChapelHillPD and #CHTraffic for the latest traffic news.

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Transit Detours Due to South Road Closure Start May 15

Chapel Hill Transit will implement detours on the A, CCX, DX, FCX, FG, G, S, U and V routes on the UNC campus beginning May 15, 2017, due to the South Road construction project. View a map of the detour.

The routes will be detoured as follows:

A Route:

 Southbound -  From Raleigh Street, (L) South Road, (R) Country Club Road, (R) Ridge Road to continue normal route

Missed stops: South Road at Student Stores, Stadium Drive at Stadium Gate #2, Stadium Drive at Ridge Road
Alternate stops:  Raleigh Street at Davis Library, South Road at Woolen Gym

 

Northbound -  From Manning Drive, (L) Ridge Road, (L) Country Club Road, (L) South Road, (R) Raleigh Street to continue normal route

Missed stops: Stadium Drive at Carmichael Hall, South Road at Fetzer Gym
Alternate Stops: South Road at Raleigh Street

 

CCX Route:

AM - From Manning Drive, (L) Ridge Road, (L) Stadium Drive, (L) South Road to continue normal route

Missed Stops: Ridge Road at Law School, South Road at Country Club Road, South Road at Raleigh Street
Alternative Stops: Stadium Drive at Carmichael Hall

 

PM - From South Columbia Street, (R) South Road, (R) Stadium Drive, (R) Ridge Road to continue normal route

Missed Stops:  South Road at Woolen Gym, South Road at Country Club Road, Ridge Road at Law School
Alternative Stops:  Stadium Drive at Stadium Gate #2, Stadium Drive at Ridge Road

 

DX Route:

From Manning Drive, (L) Ridge Road, (L) Country Club Road, (L) South Road, (R) Raleigh Street to continue normal route

Missed stops: Stadium Drive at Carmichael Hall, South Road at Fetzer Gym
Alternate Stops: South Road at Raleigh Street

 

FCX Route:

From South Columbia Street, (R) South Road, (R) Stadium Drive, (L) Ridge Road, (L) Country Club Road, (R) Raleigh Road to continue normal route

Missed Stops:  South Road at Fetzer Gym, South Road at Woolen Gym, South Road at Country Club Road
Alternative Stops: Stadium Drive at Stadium Gate #2, Ridge Road at Law School

 

G Route:

Southbound:
From South Columbia Street, (R) South Road, (R) Stadium Drive, (L) Ridge Road, (L) Country Club Road, (R) Raleigh Road to continue normal route

Missed Stops:  South Road at Fetzer Gym, South Road at Woolen Gym, South Road at Country Club Road
Alternative Stops: Stadium Drive at Stadium Gate #2, Ridge Road at Law School

 

Northbound:
From Raleigh Road, (L) Country Club Road, (R) Ridge Road, (R) Stadium Drive, (L) South Road to continue normal route

Missed Stops: South Road at Country Club Road, South Road at Raleigh Street
Alternate Stops: Ridge Road at Law School, Stadium Drive at Carmichael Hall

 

S Route:

From South Columbia Street, (R) South Road, (R) Stadium Drive, (L) Ridge Road, (L) Country Club Road, (R) Raleigh Road to continue normal route

Missed Stops:  South Road at Fetzer Gym, South Road at Woolen Gym, South Road at Country Club Road
Alternative Stops: Stadium Drive at Stadium Gate #2, Ridge Road at Law School

 

U Route:

From Raleigh Street, (L) South Road, (R) Country Club Road, (R) Ridge Road to continue normal route

Missed stops: South Road at Student Stores, Stadium Drive at Stadium Gate #2, Stadium Drive at Ridge Road
Alternate stops:  Raleigh Street at Davis Library, South Road at Woolen Gym

 

V Route:

To Meadowmont - From South Columbia Street, (R) South Road, (R) Stadium Drive, (L) Ridge Road, (L) Country Club Road, (R) Raleigh Road to continue normal route

Missed Stops:  South Road at Fetzer Gym, South Road at Woolen Gym, South Road at Country Club Road
Alternative Stops: Stadium Drive at Stadium Gate #2, Ridge Road at Law School
 
To Southern Village -  From Raleigh Road, (L) Country Club Road, (R) Ridge Road, (R) Stadium Drive, (L) South Road to continue normal route

Missed Stops: South Road at Country Club Road, South Road at Raleigh Street
Alternate Stops: Ridge Road at Law School, Stadium Drive at Carmichael Hall

 

FG Route:

To Colony Woods -  From Pittsboro Street, (L) McCauley Street, continue on South Road, (R) Stadium Drive, (L) Ridge Road, (L) Country Club Road, (R) Raleigh Road to continue normal route

Missed Stops:  South Road at Fetzer Gym, South Road at Woolen Gym, South Road at Country Club Road
Alternative Stops: Stadium Drive at Stadium Gate #2, Ridge Road at Law School

Chapel Hill Transit will make every attempt to maintain schedules on the CM, N, RU and U routes during this project, but is advising customers to expect delays and to allow extra travel time due to construction activity. The detours and any delays will also impact Next­Bus predictions for the routes. The detours are expected to last over the summer.

Chapel Hill Transit is the public transportation provider that serves Chapel Hill, Carrboro and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. For complete information about Chapel Hill Transit services, schedules, route changes or directions to the nearest Chapel Hill Transit stop, visit us at www.chtransit.org, email chtransit@townofchapelhill.org or call a customer service representative at 919-485-7433.

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Public Safety

 

 

 

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Chapel Hill Police Speed-Enforcement Initiatives

Travel with care and pay attention when driving, walking and biking.

As part of our ongoing effort to create and preserve a safe community in which to travel, the Chapel Hill Police Department and area partners will continue speed enforcement and Watch For Me N.C. initiatives throughout the month of May.

Officers may issue information, warnings or citations for anyone for violating laws. Fines and court costs for these violations begin at $213.

Multiple officers will monitor the following areas (in addition to normal Chapel Hill Police patrol practices) to encourage and enforce safe behavior from everyone:

  • 10 a.m. Monday, May 15, Seawell Elementary School
  • 2:30-4:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 16, Weaver Dairy Road Extension
  • 1-3 p.m. Tuesday, May 23, 15-501 and South Columbia Street
  • 10 a.m. – 12 noon Tuesday, May 30, Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard at Municipal Drive

Watch For Me N.C. is a statewide safety initiative designed to improve relationships on roads between people who drive, people who walk, people who roll and people who bike. People may receive helpful information, warnings, and in some cases, tickets for violations during these initiatives.

Getting Around
Chapel Hill is working to make the community safer for people who travel. Help us become a safer place to walk, bike, roll and drive. For more information, visit: townofchapelhill.org/gettingaround.

More Information
Looking for more Traffic News? Visit townofchapelhill.org/traffic. Did you know that traffic advisories may be sent directly to your email? Visit townofchapelhill.org/signup to sign up and check the box "Traffic Advisories." For assistance, contact us at info@townofchapelhill.org.

Are you on Twitter? Follow @ChapelHillGov@ChapelHillPD and #CHTraffic for the latest traffic news.

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CHAPEL HILL POLICE 

Chapel Hill Police Recover Stolen Vehicle after Crash

At 7:45 p.m. on May 10, 2017, the Chapel Hill Police Department investigated the theft of a vehicle on Nolen Lane in Chapel Hill. Officers located the stolen vehicle in the area of Southern Village. The driver, 49-year-old Chapel Hill resident Jimmy Ray Hardin, led officers on a short pursuit through the Southern Village neighborhood.

The vehicle Mr. Hardin was operating crashed into several vehicles at the intersection of Copperline Drive and Brookgreen Drive. Mr. Hardin was transported to a local medical facility shortly after the crash. Additional charges associated with this incident are pending.

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POLICE HEADQUARTERS 

Chapel Hill Police Respond to Robbery

On May 9 at approximately 2:31 p.m.., Chapel Hill Police responded to a robbery in the 1500 block of Fountain Ridge Road. Officers located the suspect vehicle on 15-501 but the vehicle fled. Durham Police Department later located the vehicle and arrested four subjects.

Chapel Hill Police Department charged Israel Njuguna and Curtis Kent Powell of Durham, with Conspiracy to Commit Robbery and Possession of Stolen Motor Vehicle. Additional charges are pending for two juveniles (14) that were also involved. Israel Njuguna and Curtis Powell are being held in the Durham County Jail. As of this report bond has not been set. Both are set for first appearance on Monday morning.

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News from Other Public Agencies

 

 

 

ORANGE COUNTY 

Orange County celebrates 10th anniversary of the Robert and Pearl Seymour Center

ORANGE COUNTY, NC (May 1, 2017)—The Orange County Department on Aging invites the public to the 10th Anniversary Celebration of the Robert and Pearl Seymour Center – Music is a Melting Pot!

The festivities are free and will take place on Friday, May 19, from 4 - 6 p.m. Seating is limited. Guests are asked to register by Friday, May 12. The Seymour Center is located at 2551 Homestead Road in Chapel Hill.

“Over the last 10 years, we have become a melting pot of different cultures, languages and life experiences, and music and dance have united us all.” said Department on Aging Director Janice Tyler 

Join us from 4 - 5 p.m. for a musical show representing everyone who comes to the Seymour Center and that it is a place of welcome for all. A special reception will follow Immediately afterward with live jazz music from 5 - 6 p.m.

For more information or to register, please call 919.968.2070.

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NATJA Ad 2017 

North American Travel Journalists Association Holding Annual Conference & Marketplace in Orange County, NC May 16-19, 2017

News release from the Chapel Hill/Orange County Visitors Bureau

Chapel Hill, NC – (May 4, 2017)  -  More than 80 travel journalists, speakers and presenters, association staff and destination marketing organization representatives will convene for the 15th Annual North American Travel Journalists Association Conference & Marketplace, May 16-19, 2017 in Orange County, NC.

The Chapel Hill/Orange County Visitors Bureau is hosting the event in partnership with Chapel Hill, Carrboro, Hillsborough, UNC-Chapel Hill, Orange County, Visit North Carolina and others. The host hotel is the Sheraton Chapel Hill. The multi-day conference includes the association’s awards luncheon, professional development, opening night celebration at the Barn of Valhalla, dine around, media marketplace and afternoon tours in Chapel Hill, Carrboro, Hillsborough, on the UNC Campus and to area Orange County Farms. The closing night dinner and reception with the awarding of the inaugural Keith Bellows award for Excellence in Travel Journalism is at The Carolina Inn. There are several pre and post media tours throughout North Carolina for those journalists traveling here early or staying an additional few days after the main conference.

“Orange County, North Carolina proudly weaves their history, culture, food and family into the very fabric of their communities, said Helen Hernandez, NATJA CEO.  “The beauty and historical significance of this area should be shared with everyone and who better than the members of a travel journalism association. NATJA looks forward to experiencing Orange County and its surrounding communities.”

NATJA’s annual gathering brings together members from throughout the US and Canada. "This conference allows us to highlight Chapel Hill, Carrboro, Hillsborough and Orange County as a top-notch visitor destination,” said Laurie Paolicelli, Chapel Hill/Orange County Visitors Bureau Director.  “We are thrilled the travel journalists will get a close up and personal look at Orange County and be able to experience our communities through our people, attractions, natural beauty, art, farms, food, music, brews, spirits and more."

Founded in 1991 by a group of sixteen travel writers, the North American Travel Journalists Association (NATJA) is one of the largest professional associations of travel writers, photographers, editors, bloggers and tourism professionals dedicated to the highest quality of journalism excellence in promoting travel and leisure activities to the general public. The group also includes destination marketing organizations (DMOs) as well. To learn more about NATJA and the conference, visit http://www.natja.org.

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About the Visitors Bureau

As the official accredited destination marketing organization of Chapel Hill and Orange County, the mission of the Chapel Hill/Orange County Visitors Bureau is to develop and coordinate visitor services in Orange County and to implement marketing programs that will enhance the economic activity and quality of life in the community.  The Visitors Bureau is a department of Orange County, NC Government. For information:  www.VisitChapelHill.org

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